Buyer's Resources


Buying a home is the largest purchase most people will ever make. Homeownership has great benefits. Homeownership also comes with certain responsibilities.

Are you ready for homeownership? Look at your current situation and determine if:

  • You have a continuing and reliable source of income prior to applying for the loan.
  • You have a credit history that shows you're ready for homeownership.
  • Your total debt is manageable and you can afford to take on the costs associated with homeownership.
  • You have money saved for a down payment and closing costs.

Once you fully understand your current situation, it's important to look at the pros and cons of homeownership to make the best decision for you and your family.

Benefits of Home Ownership

Homeownership has many advantages - both financial and personal. But buying a home is an important decision. Look at the benefits and the differences between homeownership and renting to better understand if owning a home is right for you.

What are the benefits of homeownership?

  • Tax savings.
    You may earn significant tax savings because you can deduct mortgage interest and property taxes from your federal income tax and many states' income tax if you itemize your deductions.
  • A more stable monthly housing expense.
    Your monthly housing loan or mortgage expense can remain the same for the life of your mortgage, depending on the type of loan you choose.
  • Equity.
    You may build equity in your home over the life of your loan, which allows you to plan for future goals like your child's education or your retirement.

Homeownership is not right for everyone. It may not be the right time in your life or you may not like the commitment associated with owning a home. Here are some differences between renting and homeownership:

  • Renters are typically free from maintenance obligations such as repairs or lawn care.
  • Homeowners often have more freedom in decorating, landscaping, etc.
  • Renters can move more easily and more quickly than homeowners and there are higher costs associated with buying and selling a home.
  • Homeowners have a financial investment and may build equity in their home.


How Much Can You Afford?

To get a quick idea of what you can afford to spend, multiply your annual gross income (before taxes) by 2.5. For example, if your annual household income is $50,000, you might be able to qualify for a $125,000 home. This is just a rough estimate - the actual number will vary based on factors such as your debt and credit history.

Mortgage lenders typically use the housing expense and debt-to-income ratios to more accurately determine how much you can afford to spend on your mortgage.

  • Housing Expense Ratio
    Mortgage lenders recommend that your monthly mortgage payment should be less than or equal to a quarter of your monthly gross income. This percentage can change based on the type of mortgage you choose and sometimes the area in which you're looking to buy.
  • Debt-to-Income Ratio
    You need to factor your other debts into determining an affordable monthly mortgage payment. Mortgage lenders look at whether your total debt is larger than 30-40% of your monthly gross income. Remember, debt is not just credit cards and student loans. It can also include alimony, child support, car loans, and housing expenses.

A mortgage lender, a housing counselor, or consumer credit counselor can help you better understand these guidelines. Before you talk to a financial professional, you can organize your financial picture by creating a budget. Don't forget that you also have to save for the down payment, closing costs, inspections costs, moving, and other related expenses.


What Are the Risks?

Check For Properly Working Appliances/Fixtures:
  • Bathroom
    • Sinks
    • Showers/tubs
    • Toilets
    • Vent fan
    • Heating fan
  • Appliances
    • Dishwasher
    • Stove
    • Oven
    • Ice maker
    • Garbage disposal
    • Range hood
    • Refrigerator
    • Freezer
    • Microwave
    • Trash compactor
  • Kitchen
    • Kitchen cabinet doors
    • Drawers
    • Sinks
  • General
    • Lights (interior & exterior)
    • Windows
    • Heating system
    • Ceiling fans
    • Hot water system
    • Air conditioning system
    • Electrical outlets
    • Door bells
    • Doors
    • Water purifier
    • Fireplace damper
    • Garage door
Ensure House Is Well-Built & Systems Are In Working Condition:
  • Exterior
    • Brick bulging or cracking
    • Shingles missing or broken
    • Siding rotted or missing
    • Gutters damaged or need to be cleaned
    • Concrete cracked in sidewalks/driveway
  • Basement
    • Water seepage in basement
    • Cracks in foundation
    • Poor ventilation
  • Interior
    • Sub-flooring damaged or loose
    • Cracked walls or ceiling
    • Cracked tiles
    • Loose plaster
    • Flooring damaged
    • Soft, springy floors
    • Water stains near windows
    • Water stains on ceiling below bathroom
    • Water stains in attic
    • Pipe insulation missing


Myths About Homeownership

Lenders evaluate mortgage applications a lot differently today than they did even 10 years ago. And even more has changed in the last 20 years. What used to close the door to homeownership may not be a factor today.

Here are some common homeownership myths:

Myth: You need great credit to become a homeowner.
Fact: You may still be able to buy a home with less-than-perfect credit. And remember, you can improve your credit over time.

Myth: You need to put 20% down to buy a home.
Fact: There are many types of mortgage products and programs that allow low and no down payments. But remember to factor in other costs such as closing costs, property taxes, moving expenses, and repairs.

Myth: You can't buy a home in the U.S. if you're not a citizen.
Fact: If you're a legal resident, you can purchase a home in the U.S.

Myth: If you don't have a bank account or credit cards, you can't qualify for a mortgage.
Fact: Having a bank account is always a good idea and helps you establish credit. However, lenders can approve you for a mortgage even if you don't have a bank account or credit cards. You'll likely need to keep records showing a history of payments you've made for items such as rent, utilities, and car payments.

Myth: Lenders share your personal financial information with other companies.
Fact: By law, banks and other financial institutions are restricted in their uses and disclosures of information about you. In some situations, you may choose to restrict the disclosure of your information if you don't want it to be shared.

Myth: If you're late on your monthly mortgage payments, you'll lose your house.
Fact: If you have a financial hardship, like the death of your spouse or a medical emergency and fall behind, it's possible to keep your home and get back on track if you contact your lender early.

Myth: You can't get a mortgage if you've changed jobs several times in the last few years.
Fact: Not true. You can change jobs several times and still get a loan to buy a home. Lenders understand that people change jobs. The important thing is to show that you've had a stable income.

 

美国买房过程可分为以下步骤:

1、确定买房的城市和地区;

不同城市不同社区房价不一,好学区附近的房价会比普通学区的贵,靠海的城市房价会贵,新开发的城市相对价格便宜点。买房前要做足功课。

 2、选定经纪人,签署代理服务协议

美国各个城市都有房产经纪人,对于房地产他们更专业更有经验,好的经纪人不仅信息面广,也可以为你把关按照你的需求寻找适合你的房子。选定经纪人后,买主和经纪人签署代理服务协议。经纪人为买主的服务是免费的。一般是卖主付买卖双方经纪人的佣金。

 3、预审贷款

你需要填一份买主经济状况表。经纪人会根据你的经济状况推荐你向贷款公司要贷款预审批准书。你可以自己选择贷款公司,不妨多比几家,寻找最适合的。贷款预审批准书的目的是决定你的房价上限。买主经济状况表或贷款预审批准书是报价合同的附件之一。

 4、选房看房

经纪人会根据你的要求为你寻找适合的房子。如果看到满意的,可自己开车去看周围的环境,进行初选。初选过关,再约经纪人带你去看内部。

 5、签署合同

选定满意的房子,经纪人进行市场分析帮你确定要价,准备报价合同。除了价钱定金,经纪人还会建议你选择一些附加条款,以保证你在必要时能合法取消合同,拿回定金。卖主可能会拒绝你的报价,或者还你一个价。你可以拒绝还价,或提高你的报价。如果双方达成协议,合同就签字生效了。

 6、检查房屋

除了一般房屋检查,常做的有白蚁检查[$95],修理费[$500]。条款的有效期有的可以自己选定, 有的卖方已规定好。在有效期内,买主有权以任何一项检查不合格为由取消合同或要求 卖主出钱维修处理。经纪人会向你推荐良好口碑且有执照的检查师。检查结果出来后,经纪人会为你把关,指出哪些是卖主的责任,并为你跟卖主谈判。

 7、付款

非美国人在美国买房用贷款比较麻烦,一般建议用现金购买。可多人多次汇款,每人一年的汇款额度是5万美金,如果30万美金的房子,用6个人的名义汇款到美国一般没问题。

 8、购买保险

北卡法律规定买房时必须购买火险[火灾保险],买房负责保险费$600-1000一年。

 9、交接过户

在北卡州买房在政府注册的土地管理局成立的地产公证处过户。其费用为1%,由卖方付。

 10、乔迁搬家

过户的最后一步是卖主将钥匙交给买主,过户后买主就可搬家。在过户搬家前4-5天联系水电气公司,问清要做的事。过户搬家当天再去电确认将水电气转到买主 名下。有的公司要你提供仪表数字,有的公司会自己去读仪表。电话,电视,网络服务可能要提前10到20天预约,搬家公司或租车公司也要提前两周预约。

 

买房的总费用总估算[限夏洛特]:

除了房子的价格,另外需要付的有:

1,房屋检查费$300-500,白蚁检查费$95。

2,房屋修理保险费。这是经济公司一定建议你买的,一般一年在$360-500之间,一旦发生空调、水管、厨具灶炉热水器的问题,保险公司可以修理。不然修理费是相当昂贵的。即使买了保险,修理时的人工费还是要付。一般一次在$70左右。

3,地产税。买房后预缴1-5个月的地产税,地税一般在房价的1.0-1.2%,有些旧城市的地税低些,新城市的地税高一点。比如20万美金的房子,地税在$2500-4000左右。平摊在每个月差不多300美金左右。

4,火险$600-1000左右,这是法律规定一定要买的。

5,注册费杂费$200左右;

 我们公司有持有北卡执照的专业房地产经纪人,我们也可以帮你联系全美其他任何一个州的专业房地产经纪人


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